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Whuffie (Longform Blog)
A bill that would require craft brewers to sell their suds to a beer distributor and make them buy it back to sell at their own breweries has cleared a Senate panel.
 
The measure (SB 1714) has so infuriated craft brewers and beer enthusiasts that some on Twitter have christened it with the hashtag “#growlergate.” The Community Affairs committee approved the bill Tuesday.
 
Sen. Jack Latvala, R-Clearwater, was so incensed at the idea of craft brewers having to pay someone else to sell their own product that he likened it to a mobbed-up racket. Latvala has championed the microbrewery cause.
 
The requirement is similar to paying “protection to ‘Vinnie’ in New York,” he said.
 
The bill also is favored by the Big Beer lobby, which is feeling the heat from craft beer’s competition.

‘Big Beer’ wins a round in legislative battle with Fla. microbreweries

Well, this is a giant mountain of bullshit.

(via wilwheaton)

Sobering: A boot kicking a human face forever.

(via mostlysignssomeportents)

The Internet is different. With so much information, hyperlinked text, videos alongside words and interactivity everywhere, our brains form shortcuts to deal with it all — scanning, searching for key words, scrolling up and down quickly. This is nonlinear reading, and it has been documented in academic studies. Some researchers believe that for many people, this style of reading is beginning to invade when dealing with other mediums as well. “We’re spending so much time touching, pushing, linking, scroll­ing and jumping through text that when we sit down with a novel, your daily habits of jumping, clicking, linking is just ingrained in you,” said Andrew Dillon, a University of Texas professor who studies reading. “We’re in this new era of information behavior, and we’re beginning to see the consequences of that.” Serious reading takes a hit from online scanning and skimming, researchers say - The Washington Post (via infoneer-pulse)

prostheticknowledge:

Thingful

An online map that marks and records public Internet-Of-Things projects around the world:

Thingful is a discoverability engine for The Public Internet of Things, providing a geographical index of where things are, who owns them, and how and why they are used.

Today, millions of people and organisations around the world already have and use connected ‘things’, ranging from energy monitors, weather stations and pollution sensors to animal trackers, geiger counters and shipping containers. Many choose to, or would like to, make their data available to third parties – either directly as a public resource or channeled through apps and analytical tools.

Thingful organises ‘things’ around locations and categories and structures ownership around Twitter profiles (which can be either people or organisations), enabling citizens to discuss why and how they are using their devices and data. Because, the ‘who’, ‘why’ and ‘where’ are ultimately far more important in The Public Internet of Things than the ‘what’.

Explicitly built for people, communities, companies and cities that want to make the data from these ‘things’ available and useful to others, Thingful aggregates and indexes public information from some of the major IoT platforms and data infrastructures around the world, providing direct links to datasets and profile pages for the public things that it knows about.

While this is interesting to see the scope of a potential future of internet-controllable objects … you can’t help think that there would be a huge vulnerability and scale of cyber-attacks to home devices that would be unsettling (such as this story where a baby monitor was accessed by a hacker).

You can explore Thingful yourself here

(via adhocratic)

Finally, money could also be created by gift. Digital coins could be issued to volunteers, charities, open source software firms, ecological and social justice organizations, and other people and organizations deserving support. So much important, socially necessary work goes unrewarded today. Issuing an alternative currency via such groups could remove some of their financial hardship once the currency becomes well-established. The recipients of newly issued money could be crowd-selected by the existing user base or some other voting system.

Charles Eistenstein at P2P Foundation Blog. Charles Eisenstein on the Next Step for Digital Currency (via protoslacker)

Also known as Whuffie

designstroy:

(via Sanctus Paulus)

great film

designstroy:

(via Sanctus Paulus)

great film

(via lightsyrup)

popmech:

Last week, a firestorm of protest broke out after it was revealed that the Department of Homeland Security was soliciting bids for a national license-plate scanner system. Using cameras with optical character recognition software networked to the motor vehicle database, these systems would allow police to track cars wherever they go. In the face of public outcry DHS has now backed off from that plan. But, given the way bureaucracy works, there’s likely to be another effort, perhaps with less publicity, at some point in the future. 


Don’t Get Too Comfortable—Nationwide License Plate Tracking Will Be Back

popmech:

Last week, a firestorm of protest broke out after it was revealed that the Department of Homeland Security was soliciting bids for a national license-plate scanner system. Using cameras with optical character recognition software networked to the motor vehicle database, these systems would allow police to track cars wherever they go. In the face of public outcry DHS has now backed off from that plan. But, given the way bureaucracy works, there’s likely to be another effort, perhaps with less publicity, at some point in the future. 

Don’t Get Too Comfortable—Nationwide License Plate Tracking Will Be Back

wired:

shortformblog:

Think your iPad is awesome? Screw that—try having two iPads, connected to one another with magnets, that work together. Apple just applied for patents on the technology. Mind blown yet?

Is this just like a fancy 3DS?
Lap doppel

wired:

shortformblog:

Think your iPad is awesome? Screw that—try having two iPads, connected to one another with magnets, that work together. Apple just applied for patents on the technology. Mind blown yet?

Is this just like a fancy 3DS?

Lap doppel
So It’s quite possible mobile social will have lots of services indefinitely. This creates opportunities, but also a pretty basic challenge to Facebook. Partly in response, it paid first 1% of its market value for Instagram and now close to 10% for WhatsApp, taking not dominance but at the least two of the commanding heights of mobile social. That’s the right way to think about value, I think - not ‘OMG $16bn!”, but “is this worth 10% of Facebook?’ The deal values WhatsApp users at $35 each (very close to what Google paid for YouTube, incidentally), but the current market cap of Facebook values its MAUs at $140 or so.

Whatsapp and $19bn — Benedict Evans

Many many smart people already read Benedict Evan’s take on mobile stuff. His analysis of WhatsApp is a good reminder for me about the meaning of innovation - and for all the business and finance speak, that’s what Benedict talks about the most: the value of innovation.

And when I think about the financials of tech, what founders get on exit is one of the least interesting bits — it’s much more interesting to consider what the product — how people are using it, how often they come back, how they will use it in the future — is worth to companies that think in the future tense. In many cases, breaking it down to value per user gets closer to the point than the overall price tag.

(via joshuanguyen)