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Google Riot Shield ™

pnged:

Google Riot Shield ™

(via simonsayer)

smarterplanet:

How you and I could become nodes in the internet of things
A group of French researchers believe that the sensors and transmitters we wear will route and relay data, not just collect it. We won’t just be connected to the network. We’ll be the network.

Ever wonder what the network infrastructure of the future will be? Try looking in the mirror.
Some day our bodies — or at least the clothing or accessories that adorn them — could become key network nodes in the internet of things. European researchers think that sensors and transmitters on our bodies can be used to form cooperative ad hoc networks that could be used for group indoor navigation, crowd-motion capture, health monitoring on a massive scale and especially collaborative communications. Last week, French institute CEA-Leti and three French universities have launched the Cormoran project, which aims to explore the use of such cooperative interpersonal networks.
The concept of wireless body area networks (WBANs) isn’t a new one. WBANs could be used to sever the cord between patients and their monitoring equipment. Companies like Apple and Heapslylon are exploring the possibility of connected clothes with embedded sensors. We’ve already begun embracing a new era of wearables, such as Google Glass to Fitbit (see disclosure), designed to become extensions of our senses and movements.

smarterplanet:

How you and I could become nodes in the internet of things

A group of French researchers believe that the sensors and transmitters we wear will route and relay data, not just collect it. We won’t just be connected to the network. We’ll be the network.

Ever wonder what the network infrastructure of the future will be? Try looking in the mirror.

Some day our bodies — or at least the clothing or accessories that adorn them — could become key network nodes in the internet of things. European researchers think that sensors and transmitters on our bodies can be used to form cooperative ad hoc networks that could be used for group indoor navigation, crowd-motion capture, health monitoring on a massive scale and especially collaborative communications. Last week, French institute CEA-Leti and three French universities have launched the Cormoran project, which aims to explore the use of such cooperative interpersonal networks.

fitbit oneThe concept of wireless body area networks (WBANs) isn’t a new one. WBANs could be used to sever the cord between patients and their monitoring equipment. Companies like Apple and Heapslylon are exploring the possibility of connected clothes with embedded sensors. We’ve already begun embracing a new era of wearables, such as Google Glass to Fitbit (see disclosure), designed to become extensions of our senses and movements.

Amazon’s phone could be doomed for the same reasons that Google and Facebook had problems: making, and selling, hardware comes with unfamiliar challenges for companies that are used to running Web sites. Then again, Amazon has some things going for it that Google and Facebook don’t. For one thing, it controls what is, by some measures, the biggest store in the world.

Vauhini Vara on Amazon’s Fire Phone: http://nyr.kr/1lDAagw (via newyorker)

Ultimately what can be the goal of this kind of anti trust like behavior? I find myself thinking it is a mere luxury, or status symbol. Sure the phones could be around for the next 20 years, but eventually it will fade away. I’m thinking of Hughes finally selling DirectTV after all those years.

The report is all about carbon monoxide, a seemingly rare killer that’s actually the lead cause of poisoning deaths in America. Until now, it’s been hard for the government and safety experts to estimate how often CO leaks happen, because these events are self-reported by homeowners (who usually don’t report them). But using data culled from its army of Protects—anonymized, of course, to protect user privacy—Nest has revealed something surprising: CO events aren’t all that rare. In fact, .65 percent of users experienced a carbon monoxide event during the five months that Nest analyzed. Now, that doesn’t seem like very much; it’s less than one percent. But overall, Nest estimates that about .9 percent of households are exposed to high CO, which translates into 1.4 million households in the U.S., Canada, and the UK. That’s roughly the population of Philadelphia. “Nest Protect’s built-in sensors provide the ability to detect additional pieces of environmental data, run algorithms to determine the level of danger, and report that data in real time to further enhance our understanding of these events,” explains the company.

How Nest Is Already Using All That Data From Its Army of Smoke Alarms (via infoneer-pulse)

Queue a new layer to the national survellience system.

whisperoftheshot:

engadget:

HP’s Machine technology rethinks the basics of computing

Uh wut?  

We’ve seen bits and pieces of technology that hint at the future of computing, but HP has just taken a big, big step toward bringing them all together. The company has unveiled The Machine (yes, that’s the name), a processing architecture designed to cope with the flood of data from an internet of things. It uses clusters of special-purpose cores, rather than a few generalized cores; photonics link everything instead of slow, energy-hungry copper wires;memristors give it unified memory that’s as fast as RAM yet stores data permanently, like a flash drive.
The result is a computer that can handle dramatically larger amounts of data, all the while using much less power. A Machine server could address 160 petabytes of data in 250 nanoseconds; HP says its hardware should be about six times more powerful than an existing server, even as it consumes 80 times less energy. Ditching older technology like copper also encourages non-traditional, three-dimensional computing shapes (you’re looking at a concept here), since you’re not bound by the usual distance limits. The Machine shouldn’t just be for data centers and supercomputers, either — it can shrink down to laptops and phones.

whisperoftheshot:

engadget:

HP’s Machine technology rethinks the basics of computing

Uh wut?  

We’ve seen bits and pieces of technology that hint at the future of computing, but HP has just taken a big, big step toward bringing them all together. The company has unveiled The Machine (yes, that’s the name), a processing architecture designed to cope with the flood of data from an internet of things. It uses clusters of special-purpose cores, rather than a few generalized cores; photonics link everything instead of slow, energy-hungry copper wires;memristors give it unified memory that’s as fast as RAM yet stores data permanently, like a flash drive.

The result is a computer that can handle dramatically larger amounts of data, all the while using much less power. A Machine server could address 160 petabytes of data in 250 nanoseconds; HP says its hardware should be about six times more powerful than an existing server, even as it consumes 80 times less energy. Ditching older technology like copper also encourages non-traditional, three-dimensional computing shapes (you’re looking at a concept here), since you’re not bound by the usual distance limits. The Machine shouldn’t just be for data centers and supercomputers, either — it can shrink down to laptops and phones.

(via -clu-)

Perhaps the future hemorrhages plagues of subtle duplicity, powered by super computed intelligence in the hands of the fearful. —Esau Kessler

Perhaps the future hemorrhages plagues of subtle duplicity, powered by super computed intelligence in the hands of the fearful. —Esau Kessler

(Source: recitethis.com)

Samsung took on a company with the arguably most successful consumer product ever created.

Networked Insights Reveals How Samsung Used Social Media To Hack The iPhone (via fastcompany)

"Machine learning"

(via fastcompany)

Not only did we not expect it to end up in a museum design store, we didn’t plan on a business, or even a proper product. We launched NeoLucida because we were inspired by David Hockney’s book, Secret Knowledge. He used an antique camera lucida to see how great masters of art might have seen the world. So to give our students this experience, we decided to make an inexpensive camera lucida so more people could experiment. But when we received nearly 3000% over our goal, and 11,406 people backed the project, we found ourselves designing for the marketplace instead of making a simple, small scale experiment. So being part of the Kickstarter @MoMA collection is a thrill, but far from where we thought we would be last year.

Pablo Garcia on making the NeoLucida, and how it ended up in the MoMA Design Store.  (via kickstarter)

"we found ourselves designing for the marketplace instead of making a simple, small scale experiment

tiagodoria:

This is extremely different than a more traditional news-writing process where the primary way to progress a story is to produce an entirely new article

Matt Galligan, CEO and co-founder of Circa, in Behind the App: The Story of Circa.

I love this app. It follows so smoothly the concept of ‘mobile news’. Besides that, it is perfect for commuting time.