Whuffie Stream

Whuffie (Longform Blog)

ombuarchitecture:

Nakagin Capsule Tower

Ginza • Tokyo •  Japan

Kisho Kurokawa architect & associates

via: 1972  project By Noritaka Minami

(via adhocratic)

thisistheverge:

The dumb state of the smart home Meet today’s connected home: a collection of appliances and home gadgets that offer enhanced functionality but won’t work together in concert unless you happen to buy them all from the same manufacturer — perhaps a Samsung fridge, a Samsung stove, a Samsung washer, and a Samsung dryer. That’s not very smart. What the smart home really needs is one single way for appliances to speak with each other — a standard that can do for appliances what Wi-Fi did for laptops, tablets, and the internet. Creating that is a surprisingly daunting task, though, and both making and agreeing on one is the point that’s tripped up manufacturers worldwide.

thisistheverge:

The dumb state of the smart home
Meet today’s connected home: a collection of appliances and home gadgets that offer enhanced functionality but won’t work together in concert unless you happen to buy them all from the same manufacturer — perhaps a Samsung fridge, a Samsung stove, a Samsung washer, and a Samsung dryer. That’s not very smart. What the smart home really needs is one single way for appliances to speak with each other — a standard that can do for appliances what Wi-Fi did for laptops, tablets, and the internet. Creating that is a surprisingly daunting task, though, and both making and agreeing on one is the point that’s tripped up manufacturers worldwide.

gameraboy:

Disneyland Tomorrowland Illustration  by Drive-In Mike on Flickr.
From the 1968 Disneyland Guidebook. More vintage Disney

gameraboy:

Disneyland Tomorrowland Illustration by Drive-In Mike on Flickr.

From the 1968 Disneyland Guidebook. More vintage Disney

(via vintagedisneyparks)

The public debates about the government’s measures to prevent terrorism, the character assassination of Edward Snowden and his supporters, the assurances by the powerful that no one is abusing the massive collection and storage of our electronic communications miss the point. Any state that has the capacity to monitor all its citizenry, any state that has the ability to snuff out factual public debate through control of information, any state that has the tools to instantly shut down all dissent is totalitarian. Our corporate state may not use this power today. But it will use it if it feels threatened by a population made restive by its corruption, ineptitude and mounting repression. The moment a popular movement arises—and one will arise—that truly confronts our corporate masters, our venal system of total surveillance will be thrust into overdrive. Chris Hedges (via azspot)

(via azspot)

thisistheverge:

Meet Notch, the motion tracker that maps exactly how your body moves
Fitness trackers like Fitbit and Fuelband are great at logging how much your body moves over a given day, but if you want more detail, like the angle of your knee or the jut of your hip, you’re going to need more than just one sensor. That’s where Notch comes in. 

thisistheverge:

Meet Notch, the motion tracker that maps exactly how your body moves

Fitness trackers like Fitbit and Fuelband are great at logging how much your body moves over a given day, but if you want more detail, like the angle of your knee or the jut of your hip, you’re going to need more than just one sensor. That’s where Notch comes in. 

The car companies can’t do full autonomy yet, so they do it piece by piece. Every decade or so, they introduce another bit of automation, another task gently lifted from the captain’s hands: power steering in the nineteen-fifties, cruise control as a standard feature in the seventies, antilock brakes in the eighties, electronic stability control in the nineties, the first self-parking cars in the two-thousands. The latest models can detect lane lines and steer themselves to stay within them. They can keep a steady distance from the car ahead, braking to a stop if necessary. They have night vision, blind-spot detection, and stereo cameras that can identify pedestrians. Yet the over-all approach hasn’t changed. As Levandowski [from Google] puts it, “They want to make cars that make drivers better. We want to make cars that are better than drivers.”

I’m a few weeks behind, but the NYer had an amazing x10 article on Google’s Autonomous Car Project.  This is one of the parts of the near-future that I am most excited about.  

Burkhard Bilger: Inside Google’s Driverless Car : The New Yorker

(via dpstyles)

There are tons of reasons I’m excited about driverless cars but the one I think about the most now is due to CitiBike: if the upside to one-way bike trips is so big, imagine the freedom that a driverless car can bring. 

(via mattlehrer)

Imagine cars that eat other cars and poop diamonds

(via mattlehrer)